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SEC Filings
10-K
TERRAFORM POWER, INC. filed this Form 10-K on 07/21/2017
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Risks Related to our Relationship with SunEdison and the SunEdison Bankruptcy

We are transitioning away from our historical dependence on SunEdison for important corporate, project and other services, which involves management challenges and poses risks that may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Since the SunEdison Bankruptcy, we have been engaged in efforts to transition away from our historical dependence on SunEdison for corporate, project and other services, including providing for critical systems and information technology infrastructure, by seeking to identify alternative service providers and to establish and manage new relationships, as well as develop our own capabilities and resources in these areas. These efforts include creating a separate stand-alone corporate organization, including, among other things, directly hiring employees and establishing our own accounting, information technology, human resources and other systems and infrastructure, and also include transitioning the project-level O&M and asset management services in-house or to third party service providers. However, our efforts in this regard, although designed to mitigate risks posed by the SunEdison Bankruptcy, involve a number of new risks and challenges that may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We may be unable to replicate the corporate and project-level services provided by SunEdison, either through outsourcing or performing those services ourselves on terms or at costs similar to those provided by SunEdison or at all. The fees of substitute service providers or the costs of performing all or a portion of the services ourselves are likely to be substantially more than the fees that we would pay under the MSA, which are equal to 2.5% of the Company’s cash available for distribution to shareholders in 2016 and 2017 (not to exceed $7.0 million in 2016 or $9.0 million in 2017). In addition, in light of SunEdison’s familiarity with our assets, a substitute service provider may not be able to provide the same level of service. We also continue to depend on a substantial number of outside contractors for accounting services and the costs for these services are substantially greater than those we would incur if we directly hired employees to perform the same services.

We may also be unable to perform the services ourselves, through hiring employees and migrating or establishing separate information technology systems. Implementing any changes in connection with such transition may take longer than we expect, cost more than we expect, and divert management’s attention from other aspects of our business. We may also incur substantial legal and compliance costs in many of the jurisdictions where we operate. In addition, as we have limited experience in developing our own capabilities and resources, there is no assurance that we would ultimately be successful in our efforts in each of these areas, if at all, which could result in delays or disruptions in our business and operations.

The SunEdison Bankruptcy could result in a material adverse effect on many of our projects because SunEdison is a party to a material project agreement or a guarantor thereof, or because SunEdison was the original owner of the project.

In most of our debt-financed projects, a SunEdison Debtor is a party to one or more material project agreements, including asset management or O&M agreements in its capacity as our O&M provider or asset manager, or is a guarantor of the obligations of those service providers or has provided other guarantees for the benefit of the projects and/or our financing parties. Many of our project-debt financing agreements contain covenants or defaults relating to such agreements or guarantees. As a result, the SunEdison Bankruptcy has resulted in defaults under many of our project-debt financing agreements, which are generally curable. During the course of 2016 and to date in 2017, we have obtained waivers or temporary forbearances with respect to most of these defaults and have transitioned, or are working to transition, the project-level services provided by SunEdison Debtors to third parties or in-house to a Company affiliate; however, certain of these defaults persist and no assurance can be given that any remaining waivers and/or forbearance agreements will be obtained. Similarly, in most of our tax equity-financed projects, a SunEdison Debtor is a party to one or more material project agreements, including asset management or O&M contract agreements, or provides guarantees of those project agreements or has provided other guarantees for the benefit of the projects and/or our financing parties. Many of our tax equity financed project agreements contain provisions related to, or that could be impacted by, such agreements. As a result, the SunEdison Bankruptcy could result in adverse consequences to us under many of our tax equity-financed projects. Several of our tax-equity projects are structured as master lease arrangements, under which the SunEdison Bankruptcy may trigger termination rights of the applicable tax investors.

Such defaults in our debt-financed projects and adverse consequences to us in tax equity-financed projects, if not cured or waived, may restrict the ability of the project-level subsidiaries to make distributions to us. These defaults may also entitle the related lenders to demand repayment, or enforce their security interests, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. These defaults may also permit the financing parties in our master lease arrangements to terminate the applicable leases, seek damages for contractual breaches or sweep or net project cash flows to the extent of any damages they may have incurred. If we are unable to make distributions from our project-level


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